Research Skills

Need to Know Research Words
  • A bibliography is an organised list of books and resources that you have used to research a topic. You need to include a bibliography at the end of any report you write to show where you found your information and to avoid plagiarism.
  • Plagiarism is when someone copies another person’s words or ideas and passes them off as their own. This is considered cheating and theft, and is illegal.
  • Copyright is the right to make copies of a written, musical or artistic piece of work. It is normally held by the author of the work, and is valid until seventy years after the author’s death.
  • If you are writing a report and would like to use someone else’s words you can include a direct quote in your work by putting quotation marks around the other person’s words, like in the direct quote following this sentence. “But – and this is the important thing to remember – it should never be more than a few sentences. And you should always state clearly where you took it from.” (ALCS Copyright Education Notes by Susan Elkin)
Here are some examples of how to write a bibliography:
Books

Author’s surname, Author’s first initial. (Date of publication). Title of book. Publishing company. Place of publication.
  • Example: Morris, N. (2011). Research It! The Industrial Revolution. Raintree Publishers. London.
Magazines or Newspapers
Author’s last name, Author’s first initial. (Date of publication). “Title of article.” Title of magazine/newspaper. Volume number. Page numbers.
  • Example: Williams, R. (2010). “Internet plagiarism rising in schools.” The Guardian. Page 8.
Website
(if known) Author’s last name, Author’s first initial. “Title of article.” Title of webpage. Day, month and year you saw the site. Web address. (Copyright date or revision date).
Research Resources
For more information on copyright please visit the ALCS website. You can download a copy of the ALCS guidance notes for students “Copyright – Invisible Protection” here.
 
The below books are all very helpful for information on research skills and are available in Broadlands’ library.
The Research It! series uses 6 different periods in history as examples as it demonstrates how to carry out a research project and shows you the necessary skills you will need.
  • Langley, A. (2011). Research It! World War II. Raintree Publishers. London
  • Morris, N. (2011). Research It! The Industrial Revolution. Raintree Publishers. London
  • Ross, S. (2011). Research It! Medieval Europe. Raintree Publishers. London
  • Ross, S. (2011). Research It! World War I. Raintree Publishers. London
  • Spilsbury, L. (2011). Research It! The Changing Role of Women. Raintree Publishers. London
  • Spilsbury, R. (2011). Research It! Slavery and the Slave Trade. Raintree Publishers. London
The Information Literacy Skills series has been compiled and written by professional librarians, and covers every step of the research process in detail.
  • Adcock, D & Pulver, B. (2009). Information Literacy Skills: Accessing Information. Heinemann Library. Essex.
  • Adcock, D & Pulver, B. (2009). Information Literacy Skills: Evaluating Information. Heinemann Library. Essex.
  • Adcock, D & Pulver, B. (2009). Information Literacy Skills: Organizing and Using Information. Heinemann Library. Essex.
  • Adcock, D & Pulver, B. (2009). Information Literacy Skills: Understanding the Importance of Information. Heinemann Library. Essex.